With our enticing selection of classical and pops concerts, there’s a concert for every music lover.

The New Bedford Symphony Orchestra is dedicated to the proposition that classical music can enrich and transform lives. That is why we are very pleased to offer you exciting, moving, and beautiful music. It is also why we remain committed to expanding the educational programs we offer to children in our region—last year more than 8,000 children benefited from our music programs! And finally, it is why we continue to build strong relationships with other music and cultural organizations in our region. We believe collaboration makes all organizations, and our community, stronger. Whether you are a first-time concertgoer or an NBSO regular, we welcome you to our community of music!

Visit the NBSO at www.nbsymphony.org.

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New Bedford Symphony Orchestra

 Events

Saturday
Oct
01
7:30 pm
Saturday
May
20
7:30 pm
Sat
7:30 pm
Oct
1
Sat
7:30 pm
May
20
New Bedford Symphony Orchestra
 presents

2022-23 Season

Subscriptions

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$10 - $65

The NBSO is thrilled to invite you to our 2022-23 season!

There are several discounted subscription options for you to enjoy the 2022-23 season. Individual concert tickets will go on sale mid August, on a date yet to be announced.

Subscription packages are available for purchase now!

To purchase the complete series of 7 performances, click the TICKETS button above.

To purchase a subscription for 3, 4, 5, or 6 performances, click here for the Choose Your Own Series. Make your selection at check-out.

Here's a look at NBSO's 2022-23 Season:

American Dream

Saturday, October 1, 7:30PM

Bella Hristova, violin

Yaniv Dinur, conductor

Wynton Marsalis: Violin Concerto 

Antonín Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From the New World”

Jazz, blues, habanera, spirituals, and anthems are all part of this whirlwind of a violin concerto by American Jazz legend, Wynton Marsalis, and performed by sensational Bulgarian-American violinist Bella Hristova. Dvořák’s “New World” Symphony is considered the first attempt to write an American symphony. Is it a depiction of the New World, or an expression of longing for the “old” one? That’s up to our audience to decide.

 

Yaniv plays Brahms

Saturday, October 29, 7:30PM

Yaniv Dinur, piano

Oriol Sans, conductor

Ottorino Respighi: Fountains of Rome

Zhou Tian: Transcend

Johannes Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 1

Featuring guest conductor Oriol Sans, this concert juxtaposes two pieces about places, culture, people ,and sounds. The iconic fountains around Rome with their magnificent sculptures come to life in the gorgeous composition of Respighi. In his exhilarating piece, Chinese-American composer Zhou Tian evokes the story of the people who built the transcontinental railroad that linked the United States from east to west.  In the second half, Yaniv Dinur is the soloist in Brahms’ symphonic First Piano Concerto.

Holiday Pops

Sunday, December 11, 3:30 and 7 PM

Yaniv Dinur, conductor and emcee

Appearances by the Southeastern Massachusetts Youth Orchestra and the Showstoppers

Share the joy of the season with friends and family at the best holiday concert in town! Our magnificent orchestra plays all your seasonal favorites, and the Showstoppers and Southeastern Massachusetts Youth Orchestra members join in for a performance that will make everyone merry!

Our family-friendly atmosphere, the festively decorated theater, and your choice of performance times make this the perfect holiday outing. The children’s matinee at 3:30 features fun surprises for the young at heart, while the 7 PM concert features a bit more music. Both performances are approximately one hour long, with no intermission.

 

The Magic of Disney

Saturday, January 28, 7:30 PM

Yaniv Dinur, conductor and emcee

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Walt Disney Company, this season’s “movie night” concert will feature music from The Little Mermaid, Fantasia, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, Lion King, Toy Story, Frozen, Coco, and many other unforgettable tunes that have touched the hearts of millions around the world. 

What stage antics will your favorite Maestro come up with this time? You’ll have to attend to find out!

 

Gluzman Plays Beethoven

Saturday, March 25, 7:30PM

Vadim Gluzman, violin

Yaniv Dinur, conductor

Anna Clyne: Masquerade

Ludwig van Beethoven: Violin Concerto 

William Walton: Symphony No. 1

One of today’s leading violinists, Vadim Gluzman brings his artistry to perform Beethoven’s immortal violin concerto, a piece full of beauty and invention that is born out of four drum strikes. English music rounds out this program: Anna Clyne’s masterful treatment of the orchestra in Masquerade, and William Walton’s First Symphony –arguably the greatest symphony written in the 20th century, full of intoxicating rhythms and virtuosic orchestral playing.

 

Mahler’s Farewell

Saturday, April 8, 7:30PM

Yaniv Dinur, conductor

Deconstructing Mahler –an inside look into Mahler’s last symphony

Gustav Mahler: Symphony No. 9

In the first half of this unique concert, Yaniv and the NBSO will take apart Mahler’s last symphony and look at it through the musician's lens, using live demonstrations and explanations from the stage. After intermission, they will perform the entire symphony, Mahler’s swan song, and perhaps his most personal work.

 

Korsantia Plays the “Emperor”

Saturday, May 20, 7:30 PM

Alexander Korsantia, piano

Yaniv Dinur, conductor

Valerie Coleman: Umoja, Anthem of Unity

Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 5 (Emperor)

Dmitri Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10

This program features three composers who, each in their own way, call for unity and peace. American composer Valerie Coleman writes an anthem for kindness and humanity that fights injustice and racism. New Bedford’s favorite Alexander Korsantia performs the majestic Fifth Piano Concerto of Beethoven – perhaps the most famous humanist composer. The NBSO concludes the season with Shostakovich’s 10th Symphony, a piece full of pain, terror, and, finally – immense joy. Using his own initials translated into musical notes, Shostakovich signifies the triumph of the individual over a terrorizing and dehumanizing regime. 

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